FOSS4G Korea 2020

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■ Online Conference: English Track 02

Schedule: 13th November, 12:00 ~ 17:40 (Seoul, Korea Standard Time)

Session 6 / Moderator: HaeKyong Kang

Time(KST) Contents
12:00~12:20 GIS for City Gas Distribution in India using Open Source Tools - 'A New Normal' (slides)
Saurabh Varma / Science and Technology Park Pune, Supported by DST, Govt, of India
India has shown tremendous increase in City Gas Distribution (CGD) in recent years. It has witnessed an increase in coverage by nearly 71% of the cumulative population spanning 400 districts. There is an urgent demand for mapping of these vast and critical gas utilities on GIS. Gas on Open PRP (Go PRP) solution is India’ first solution to utilize open source tools for developing customized solutions on Desktop GIS and Web-GIS for gas utility. It is an effective single platform tool for business development, project execution, planning, operation and maintenance teams with a low cost personalized solution in CGD sector.
12:20~12:40 Using FOSS to estimate the Land Surface Temperature (slides)
Nimish Gupta / Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur
India is undergoing unprecedented shift towards urbanization and this change is directly correlated with global warming and climate change. Changes to earth's surface characteristics like ruggedness, albedo surface, moisture content, vegetation covers, and structure affect the mechanism for the exchange of radiation and heat between the atmosphere and the surface directly. All this has prompted the surface temperature to increase which is the major contributor to climatic changes across the globe as per the IPCC reports. The earth's land surface temperature (LST) is changing at an alarming pace, that increases the thermal discomfort. The Temperature emissivity Separation maintains the shape of the emissivity spectrum with the help of ELD (Emissivity Log Difference). The main objective of this research is to retrieve LST using FOSS tools and open data of landsat and to improve/test the TES method and demonstrate the application on Kolkata metropolitan area (KMA) in India.
12:40~13:00 IMPACT OF SEA-LEVEL RISING DUE TO GLOBAL WARMING – A GEOSPALIAL APPROACH (slides)
SUDHARSAN SANTHANAKRISHNAN / Bharathidasan University
IMPACT OF SEA-LEVEL RISING DUE TO GLOBAL WARMING
– A GEOSPATIAL APPROACH
Sudharsan. S1 and Vignesh.P.M1
1Bharathidasan University, Tamilnadu, India
1, sudharsansuren24@gmail.com
2, vigneshpmvicky@gmail.com
Nowadays, the sea level rise is a prominent issue faced due to anthropogenic activities, which leads to the imbalance of oceanic current. This affects the life cycle of the marine organisms and the increase in the amount of carbon dioxide leads to high sea surface temperature. The study proposed the depletion of ice boundary in the southern region of Antarctica. The shoreline change analysis is performed from 1997 to 2020. This research also correlated the sea surface temperature with the depletion of glacial layer by using the linear regression analysis. The result shows the depletion in the glacial surface in proportion with temperature. Key points: Global warming, sea-level rising, ice melting, Shoreline change, Linear Regression.
13:00~13:20 SPATIO-TEMPORAL SHORELINE PREDICITION AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT ALONG THE PARTS OF COROMONDAL COAST, INDIA (slides)
MIRA SHIVANI S / BHARATHIDASAN UNIVERSITY, TIRUCHIRAPPALLI, TAMIL NADU, INDIA
SPATIO-TEMPORAL SHORELINE PREDICITION AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT ALONG THE PARTS OF COROMONDAL COAST, INDIA
Mira Shivani S 1*, Salghuna N N 1
1Department of Remote Sensing, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, India
smirashivani@gmail.com, salghuna@gmail.com
Abstract
Coastal Zone is a fragile & dynamic area where waves, tides and marine currents continuously modify the features in the coastal region. The study is carried out in Puducherry Coastal area, part of Coromandel coast, India which is stretched for approximately 20 Kms. The study aims to predict the shoreline changes and the vulnerable zones of Pondicherry coast. Temporal datasets are used for understanding the evolutional changes of the shoreline and predict the future changes along the coastline. SOI Toposheet (1972), Landsat-5 (1990) and Landsat-8 (2020) are acquired for the study. The shorelines were digitized and transect points were delineated for every 1 Km. The transect based differences were measured for all the three shorelines (either erosion or accretion ;1972-1990, 1990-2020). The study used Exploratory data analysis to recognize the data sets and condense their principal characteristics, to forecast the shoreline location in 2050. Also, the study assigned index values from 1-5 for Geomorphology, Coastal Slope, Rate of Erosion or Accretion, Rate of Sea level Rise, Mean Wave Height, Mean Tidal Range and then calculated the Coastal Vulnerability Index to classify into 5 classes as very low, low, moderate, high and very high which identifies the most vulnerable zone in the coastal region in the current scenario (2020).
Keywords: Shoreline Prediction, Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI), QGIS, Exploratory data analysis (EDA)
13:20~13:40 GEOSPATIAL DEMARCATION OF CRIME AGAINST WOMEN IN INDIAN CONTEXT (slides)
RUBINI M R / BHARATHIDASAN UNIVERSITY, TIRUCHIRAPPALLI
GEOSPATIAL DEMARCATION OF CRIME AGAINST WOMEN IN INDIAN CONTEXT
13:40 ~ 14:00 Q&A & Coffee Break

Session 7 / Moderator: Sanghee Shin

Time(KST) Contents
14:00~14:20 Socio-economic inclusion of transgender community through Smart interventions in India
SAKSHI DHRUVE / Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal
Smart City concept targets a better quality of life and enables the development of smart communities. India plans to build 100 smart cities with ICT and digital governance at its core. However these cities may prove exclusionary for marginalized group. The transgender community in India has been facing socio-economic apathy. This paper aims to understand the issues of the community in urban areas of the country and how the lack of access to infrastructure worsens their liveability. The paper looks at the usage of digital interventions for area-based development and PAN city-initiatives for them. The proposals aim to strengthen the third pillar of Smart City, i.e., 'People' and tries to shift back attention to this side-lined imperative at a macro-level.
14:20~14:40 Investigating the Effect of Lockdown During COVID-19 on Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Cooling Degree Days (CDD): Study of Paschim Medinipur district in West Bengal. India
Aniruddha Khatua / National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal
Urban environment imposes challenges due to its dynamics and thermodynamic characteristics of the built environment. The present study aims to study the effect of lockdown during COVID-19 on the spatio-temporal land surface temperature (LST) and Cooling Degree Days (CDD) patterns in Garmal village.
Places with high built-up density had minimum decrease in LST; on the contrary, wards with large proportion of open spaces and having low, medium built-up density had the maximum decrease in LST, whereas the CDD is proportional. It was observed that there was an increase in number of hot spots accompanied by a decrease in thermal comfort level during lockdown. The methodology proposed in the present study can be applied to other Indian cities which exhibit similar growth patterns and will provide a tool for rational decision making.
14:40~15:00 ASSESSMENT OF URBAN SPATIAL GROWTH FOR TRICHY DISTRICT, TAMINADU FOR BETTER SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT USING GEOSPATIAL TECHNIQUES G.Meenatchi1, G.Gowtham1, P.M.Vignesh1, B.Dharani1 (slides)
G.Meenatchi and G.Gowtham / Bharathidasan University
The Industrial expansion, advanced technologies and economic improvement has inspired people to move closer to urban and semi-urban areas in a country. And also due to over population growth, it has negative impacts on the environment. So the urban solid waste management is a global environmental problem in today’s world. The primary reason for urbanization is the rapid Landuse/Land cover (LULC) changes due to urbanization and related concretization. In this study, Land Surface Temperature (LST), NDVI and NDBI maps were prepared to assess the change detection and correlation between LULC and Urban pattern for the years 1997, 2007and 2019 in Trichy City, Tamilnadu, India. According to that, the suitable sites for dumping solid waste were proposed using open GIS software.
Keywords: Solid waste management, Urbanization, GIS, Site selection
15:00~15:20 A NOVEL NON – DESTRUCTIVE SELF DESIGNED TECHNIQUE FOR UPSCALING CHOROPHYLL REGION USING DART MODEL
Hussain P / National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal
Chlorophyll pigments influence reflectance of leaves and are a key indicator of photosynthesis. There are many traditional methods for estimating chlorophyll most of which involves intense lab analysis and loss of pigments. Non- destructive techniques are best suitable for evaluating photosynthetic pigment concentrations. Among these non-destructive techniques, hyperspectral remote sensing was proven to be one of the best approaches. In this study effectiveness of hyperspectral indices is tested in estimating chlorophyll pigments at leaf and canopy levels for ten species. Pigment Specific Normalised Difference (PSND), Pigment Specific Simple Ratio (PSSR) are the hyperspectral indices used and PSSR showed good results compared to PSND. Effectiveness of indices are tested by comparing the indices of ten species at canopy level whose reflectance is derived from DART. DART (Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer) a 3-D Radiative Transfer (RT) model is designed for simulating radiative propagation from visible to TIR in complex, heterogeneous landscapes like forests with atmosphere and topography. DART uses structural and spectral properties of objects for radiation simulations. DART was used for simulating forest canopies and the simulation accuracy of canopy reflectance is tested by other RT models. Using indices ratio between Dart derived canopy and leaf level, self-developed approach Correlational Ratio is developed for deriving canopy reflectance from leaf reflectance, and the same when compared with DART canopy reflectance showed good correlation. The statistical technique CORA (Correlation Ratio) is developed for evaluating canopy reflectance from leaf reflectance.
15:20~15:40 Geospatial analysis for powering India for future generations
Nalin Jain, N N Salghuna / Active Spatial Sciences Research Group (ASSRG), India
Energy generation depends on renewable and non-renewable sources. Since power demand is increasing day by day in entire world and it is also one of the fundamental infrastructure input for the development, its prospects and availability sets significant constraints on the socio-economic growth of every person as well as every country. In the past, several electricity demand studies have been published for India, based on aggregate macro data at the country or sub-national/state level. Power demand forecasting is a significant factor in the planning and economic and secure operation of modern power system. The study aims to analyse the consumption of Power Demand at Minimum and Maximum level in India. The research correlates between population and GDP and electricity price per state to maximize the generated energy utility in the country. Also, the paper recommends to fulfill demand of power at every state and economic growth for future India.
15:40 ~ 16:00 Q&A & Coffee Break

Session 8 / Moderator: Kyusung Choi

Time(KST) Contents
16:00~16:20 THE GEOSPATIAL REPRESENTATION OF RADICAL NEW VISION OF AIR QUALITY FOR INDIAN CITIES
Dhritiman Das / AvaKaza Geo-Science Research Technologies
Poor air quality is one of the most urgent environmental health concerns. As the whole world is morphing into a better, easier, and extravagant lifestyle, the environment and the atmosphere one lives in are at stake. India is home to some of the most polluted cities in the entire world. The alarming rising levels of pollutants and the degradation of air quality are mostly because of anthropogenic activities. This year, amidst the devastating Covid-19 pandemic, a rare significant and positive outcome was seen as the nation went into a complete standstill. There was a drastic change in air quality. This study focuses on a comparative study of different parameters used to measure Air Quality Index, before and after the outbreak of corona virus. The result shows a significant drop in the levels of most of the pollutants in many cities across the country, during the pandemic as all the industrial, vehicular, and construction activities were brought to a halt. This invites a discussion if regulation and implementation of certain restrictions can be an effective alternative measure to keep a check on the air quality.
Keywords: Air quality index, COVID19, India, anthropogenic activities
16:20~16:40 INDIA BREATHES EASY AMID LOCKDOWN – A GEOSPATIAL EVIDENCE (slides)
Priyam Nayana Neog / AvaKaza Geo-Science Research Technologies, Bangalore, India
Air pollution has been a major issue in India for the last two decades. The growth of economic structure of the country has majorly contributed to air pollution. However, when the Covid-19 pandemic shook the entire nation into a standstill, the air quality had improved considerably due to mandatory traffic regulations, shutting down of the industries, inactive transportation, etc. in the last 6 months. The study focuses on the air pollution of India right before the pandemic lockdown and during its various lockdown and unlocks phases in 2020. Taking into account the several pollutant parameters for 231 monitoring stations all over India, point analyses was carried out after calculating the average for each parameter duringall the phases. This study will help in realizing the drastic difference in the air quality before, during and after the lockdown. It emphasizes on the importance of temporary lockdown of human affairs in the future, for suitable time intervals, and how that will help to mend the environment.
Keywords: Air pollution, India, environment, geospatial solution
16:40~17:00 Assessment of physical infrastructure of a hill town: A case study of Gangtok, India (slides)
Pousali Chakraborty,N N Salghuna / Active Spatial Sciences Research Group (ASSRG),Trichi, Tamilnadu
In this study, availability of infrastructural facilities (Physical and social) of Gangtok, India is analysed based on the primary survey (2019) data collected at ward level through composite infrastructure development index (IDI). As one of the 12 pillars of global competitive index and recognized as goal 9 of Sustainable Development Goals (SDG 2030) by United Nations, infrastructure plays an important role in improving quality of life, economic growth and development. Physical infrastructure helps improving the economic activity while social infrastructure helps building human capital. Various factors obtained on the basis of user response are compacted further by a simple multivariate analysis to extract the most relevant and impactful ones to construct the index. The result shows an intra-ward non-uniformity, when ranked and mapped accordingly in QGIS to compare with the subsequent level of service. The result has a significant relationship with employment and poverty, thus can be considered as an important factor in determining the economic growth of the study area.
Keywords
Infrastructure development index (IDI), Physical Infrastructure Development Index (PIDI), Social Infrastructure Development Index (SIDI), Principal component analysis (PCA), Economic growth, QGIS
17:00~17:20 Modeling the species of Araku forest using 3D DART model
Muhammed Rashid R / Active Spatial Sciences Research Group (ASSRG)
Forest models are very much helpful as forest management tool as it gives information about the trees in the forest. This study is an attempt to construct a forest model using Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model. A total of 70 trees of 10 different species are taken in 3 field visits conducted at three different seasons. The data like the type of species, position of trees (latitude and longitude), trunk height below the crown, trunk height within the crown, trunk diameter below the crown, crown height, leaf area index (LAI) and crown type are collected from Araku forest. Mainly two assumptions made for the construction of mock forest 1) The surface is Lambertian in nature, 2) Canopy structure of all collected trees are homogeneous. DART simulation editor window is used in software to give inputs. Flux tracking, a default radiative method is selected, and the Analytic method is selected as a method for transferring radiation between Top of Atmosphere (TOA) and Bottom of Atmosphere (BOA). Four spectral bands representing Blue, Green, Red, and near-infrared (NIR) bands at mode R are given as Flux-tracking parameters. Aerial view and terrestrial views of mock forest were created along with images of different bands (red, green and blue) and composites (FCC and TCC). 3D DART model is a very useful method to construct mock forest if we have data about biophysical measurements and the location of trees in a plot.
17:20 ~ 17:30 Q&A & Coffee Break

OSGeo Korean Chapter AGM

Time(KST) Contents
17:40 ~ 18:00 OSGeo Korean Chapter